HomeHorticultural businessTechnologiesA German horticultural farm will triple the cultivation of apricots under cover
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A German horticultural farm will triple the cultivation of apricots under cover

Thanks to the weather-related advances in vegetation, the Wehenpohl family was able to harvest the first apricots in the heart of the Oldenburg Münsterland region as early as mid-June. “We are now about halfway through the harvest, which means that we are comparatively one to two weeks ahead of last year’s harvest. So far, quality has been quite convincing, but the quantities are manageable. This is again due to the fact that the plant is still relatively young, and we therefore do not yet have a full yield,” explains Hubertus Wehenpohl, who primarily supplies the wholesale markets via his long-standing marketing partner ELO eG. However, he confirms that he also plans to supply selected food retail outlets in the future, FreshPlaza notes.

Apricot cultivation: Thanks to the Haygrove roofing, the Wehenpohl family’s stone fruit orchard has been spared waterlogging and rain damage.

A total of six apricot varieties are currently growing and thriving in the covered facility. “We are now planning to triple our capacity in the coming year. This new plant should then start to bear fruit in 2026,” says Wehenpohl. The diversity of varieties should contribute to the widest possible harvest window, although in practice the crop is highly dependent on the weather. “Last year, we had the problem that all varieties came into yield almost simultaneously, which is why we were through with the entire harvest within around 14 days. That’s actually not the case this year: we’re now starting with the fourth variety called ‘Harogem’ and will probably be able to offer regional apricots by the end of July.”

In addition to apricots, the Wehenpohl family also produces smaller quantities of peaches and nectarines. The peach harvest started at the beginning of week 27.

Read also: Sweet and sour cherries, blackcurrants for freezing – the EU market overview

Each apricot has its own characteristics, with colouring, fruit size and flavour being important parameters, continues Wehenpohl. “Personally, I was particularly impressed by the flavour of the Vanillacot variety. However, we will only be offering this for the first time next year.”

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